Tracing Tea in the News

 

Summer 2010

Kyrgyzstan's Golden Future

 

The little known, landlocked and mountainous Republic of Kyrgyzstan clings to existence somewhat perilously. April 2010 saw a violent political revolution, the second in half a decade, and for a few days it seemed that the state and its people were poised to destroy one another...

 

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August 2010

The Silk Road

 

It's one of the most well-travelled and historically important routes on the planet, bridging the gap between east and west for centuries. Take a journey through the heart of Asia, and follow the Silk Road...

 

A successful day's travel on the Silk Road in one when you haven't been faced with a bowl of fermented horse milk, offal from an unidentified animal (possibly once a pet) or steaming yak butter tea...

 

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Spring 2010

Kyrgyzstan: All is Gold but what Glistens?

 

The tiny, mountainous republic of Kyrgyzstan rests in the shadow of more famous neighbours: Kazakhstan, China and Afghanistan. Total economic collapse after the break-up of the Soviet Union was followed by large scale foreign investment and slow but steady growth, enabling GDP (PPP) to peak at$13.5 billion in 2003. For the past three years, the size of the economy has remained fairly constant at a little over $10 billion...

 

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Fall 2009

Not your average Overlanding Machine: The Karakorum Highway by Tuk-Tuk

 

'Madam, there appears to be a dead bird in your luggage'. Of all the greetings I could have received at the Pakistan border, I can say for sure that this was not the one I had anticipated. The security officer duly pointed to the apparent source of the smell, a wicker picnic basket, gestured for me to open it, then looked profoundly disappointed when it contained neither a deceased parrot nor confiscatable contraband...

 

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April 2009

Truce with the Taliban: What price for peace in Pakistan?

 

April 13th 2009 was a dark day for Pakistan. After 18 months of violence in the Swat Valley, the Pakistani government approved a ceasefire agreement that ceded control of the district in the North West Frontier Province (NWFP) to Taliban militants and allowed them to impose Sharia (Islamic law)...

 

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January 2010

Going Nomad in Kyrgyzstan

 

Unless you’re driving in from China or a neighboring ‘Stan, every Kyrgyz trip starts and ends in the capital, Bishkek. The surrounding mountains may call out, especially once you’ve eyed up the Soviet concrete and rush-hour traffic, but they’re not going anywhere. Take a day or so to explore the city.

 

It’s been 20 years since independence, but entertaining reminders of Communism and the Cold War are easy to spot...

 

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December 2009

Dead Goat Polo: National Sport of Kyrgyzstan

 

Dead Goat Polo may not be the most charming name for a sport, but it certainly does what it says on the tin.

 

Raiding and kidnapping the neighbouring village may no longer be as acceptable as it once was (though bride-napping remains in vogue), but in its place the Kyrgyz have a surrogate pastime that offers the same outlet for aggression and a similar showcase for horsemanship...

 

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Fall 2009

"Madam, there appears to be a dead bird in your luggage"

 

Of all the greetings I could have received at the Pakistan Border, I can say for sure that this was not one I had anticipated. The security officer on duty pointed to the apparent source of the smell, a wicker basket, gestured for me to openit, then looked profoundly disappointed when it contained neither a deceased parrot nor confiscatacle contraband...

 

 

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Fall 2009

Krause Center for Innovation • Foothill College

 

Gayle Britt, a KCI program director, has been working in collaboration with local teachers to create a technology-enriched social studies curriculum that stimulates and enlightens middle-school students while meeting California content standards. Seventh-grade students in Tom Sayer’s world history class at Graham Middle School (Mountain View, CA) are engaged in the learning adventure, Tracing Tea. Max Lovell-Hoare, a document film director, is taking these middle-school students on a virtual field trip ...

 

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November 2009

Following the Silk Road

 

The way to begin any Central Asian meeting, be it in
Almaty or Ulaanbaatar, is with half a cup of tea. Whether
green or black, with milk or without, the proffering of
half a steaming cup shows that your host is willing to listen and
that your presence in the room is accepted. Conversation will continue
only as long as each cup is poured half full; once the tea cup
is filled to the brim, your host has given you a sign: This is your
final cup of tea and your allotted time is up, so please finish your
spiel and leave..

 

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August 2009

China, the Red Dragon

 

Once upon a time, in the wilds of ancient China, sat
a man named Shen Nong (“the Divine Cultivator”).
Shen Nong had a unique gift: His stomach was
transparent, so he could see the impact on his body of everything
he ate. One day, as Shen Nong sat thinking beneath
a tree, a few leaves fell into his bowl of water. Intrigued by
this unexpected brew and confident he knew the antidote to
any poison, he drank the infusion. Watching his stomach, he
knew the drink was good.

 

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July 2009

On the Trail

 

How far would you go for a cup of tea? How about 24,000 kilometres?
In this Holland Herald exclusive, the documentary filmmakers who are ‘tracing tea’ share their stories about their eastern quest to discover the history of this delicious brew.

 

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July 2009

Iran & Turkey: Drinking the Undrinkable

 

... Let it not be said, however, that Tracing Tea is easily deterred. You cannot truly judge the quality of a tea, good or bad, unless you appreciate and understand the characteristics of the full quality spectrum. Perhaps even more important, every tea and every place have a story to tell, and the stories of lesser teas may be the most interesting of all.

 

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May 2009

Tracing Tea, Pakistan's Fledgeling Tea Industry

 

Separation from East Pakistan (modern-day Bangladesh)
in 1971 turned Pakistan overnight from a tea exporter to
an importer, a situation that continues today. However, a
tepid relationship with India, concern about over-dependence on
Kenya, and the availability of large amounts of suitable land for
tea cultivation within Pakistan itself are motivating change in
the subcontinent: Pakistan has set its sights on self-sufficiency
in tea production.

 

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May 2009

GREENER VIEW, a fresh perspective

SCOTLAND'S ONLY DEDICATED MAGAZINE FOR GREENER LIVING

 

Tracing Tea

 

 

 

 

 

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March 2009

Tracing Tea

 

TV documentary Tracing Tea crosses two continents on its epic pursuit of some of the ancient tea trading routes from Darjeeling to London. As if that weren’t challenging enough, the team’s making this mammoth journey across
18 countries and three mountain ranges by the humble tuk-tuk. Air Astana is one of its corporate sponsors, and tengri looks at the expedition’s progress so far from Darjeeling to Bishkek.

 

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December 2008

Living of the Land

 

Throw away your artificial pesticides and fertilizers, and instead look to bridging the material and spiritual world as the solution to your problems. In the year before his death in 1925, the Austrian philosopher Rudolf Steiner delivered eight lectures titled “Spiritual Foundations for
the Renewal of Agriculture.”

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December 2008

Tracing tea

 

In the 23 years that the Kunjerab has been open to foreigners, hundreds of Landrovers, buses and cyclists have passed through, but
the world’s highest border crossing remained off limits for auto-rickshaws – until now.


On October 31, ‘Tracing Tea’ members Andrew Daynes, Max Lovell-Hoare, Sam Datte-Paulin and Sophie Ibbotson completed the first
auto-rickshaw crossing of the 4,693m pass between Pakistan and China.

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December 2008

Jainism and the legendary Delhi bird hospital

 

The story of Delhi's Jain Bird Hospital begins, as all fairytales should, with a king in his palace in the East. The king, a follower of the Jain religion, is a pigeon fancier with a thousand birds, but one in particular has his heart...

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September 2008

‘Tracing Tea’ :
Director, students share across the globe

 

Max Lovell-Hoare is on what can only be described as the world’s most ambitious field trip.

The documentary film director and his crew will drive from Darjeeling, India, to London, England, through 18 Asian and European countries, to investigate tea, travel and culture, and they are taking a seventh-grade class from Mountain View’s Graham Middle School along for the ride....

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August 2008

Tea on wheels...

 

KOLKATA, Aug. 22: India’s tea exports may have declined but tea to the English is still picnic outdoors. A nine-member group, comprising four students and the rest technicians travelling from Darjeeling to London, through a documentary, Tracing Tea, ....

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August 2008

An Epic Journey, Tracing Tea in Pursuit of the Ultimate Cuppa

 

How far would you go for the peerfect cup of tea?. Across the street?. To the end of the block?. How about 15,000 miles? ....

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August 2008

An 15,000km trip follows the history of tea across world

 

A GRADUATE has embarked on a 15,000km journey across 15 countries in a motorised rickshaw for a film tracing the cultural roots of tea. ....

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August 2008

An Epic Journey, Tracing Tea touring Darjeeling

 

As part of a project titled Tracing Tea, four students and a film vrew are following the leaf from Darjeeling's Makaibari Estate, through 18 tea-drinking nations to Britain. ....

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August 2008

A 15,000km trip for a cup of tea

 

A GROUP of adventurers has begun a seven-month expedition exploring the world’s tea routes – in a tuk tuk. ...

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August 2008

Tuk-tuk travels to trace tea

 

A tea-mad Isleworth man is preparing to hit the road in a tiny tuk-tuk to trace the popular beverage's long history ...

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July 2008

Tea Tasting at the Top

 

In July Brenda and Jessica from Tea at the Top (top of the Antiques Markets in Catherine Street) held two tea tasting sessions in conjunction with 'Tracing Tea' an organisation that, remarkably, is taking two tuk-tuks across 15,000 miles overland from Darjeeling to London, followed by a professional film crew to record this incredible Journey.

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February 2008

A London Taxi in Tehran

 

Where are you from? England? ...Good! Welcome to Iran! Leaning from out of their car windows, this friendly call followed us down every street in Teheran. A second later our new acquaintances, ... Read full article

11 May 2008

'Tea with Mussolini' museum in a stew

 

A London entrepreneur is drawing plans to safeguard an internationally renowned colection that pays homage to the tea trade, following the death of the man who assembled it ... Read full article

July 2007

Tea Holidays

 

When considering the tea bag or glass of chai in their hand, few people think of anywhere other than Assam and Darjeeling; such is the hold that India has on popular imagination. It is well-known that Assam's tea plant

... Read full article

 

8 March 2007

Students plan 10,000-mile tea break to bag rickshaw record

 

A group of Cambridge University undergraduates plan to travel from Calcutta to Cambridge by rickshaw in a recordbreaking gesture of appreciation for the great British cup of tea.


The six students started their journey on the 23 February and will spend 160 days on a ten thousand mile route tracing tea’s cultural history. Far from simply jumping in a jeep, however, they plan on making the entire journey in three-wheeled motorised rickshaws with a top speed of 30mph. If successful, they will break the record for the longest distance ever covered in their
(somewhat bumpy!) chosen form of transport. ... Read full article